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A novice's guide to producing his own food


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The year of the bee

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Goodness, has it really been three months since my last post? Doesn’t seem that long since we were emerging from winter, and already the longest day has been and gone.

Of course, I’m sure this is a common feeling among all allotmenteers. Spring and summer are the busiest times, and almost all daylight hours are spent planting, weeding, watering or harvesting.

But it is the bees that have taken up an increasingly large slab of my time this year. I am slowly making the transition from a novice beekeeper who spends all his time in crisis management, to one who is starting to feel in control of his bees. And once you get to that stage, you can start playing about with your colonies, manipulating and experimenting with them in all sorts of ways.

I began the year with three colonies, had hoped to get nine by the end, but have eight, so I’m quite pleased. I had split each of the original hives three times, but two swarms escaped (incurring the wrath of a neighbouring family whose house also became a home to some of my bees), thus leaving me with seven. However, I managed to catch a swarm from a garden  about six miles from the apiary. As you will hear in the video below, that colony had a marked queen, so it belonged to another beekeeper. (Finders keepers, is the rule here, but if I hear of someone with a missing colony, they can have it back.)

So, that makes eight colonies. Not bad. About half are fairly weak, so  my next goal is to try to build up their strength, so they are as healthy as possible as they go into winter.

Aside from losing two swarms, my main shock so far this year has been  a hive which toppled over. Check out the video.

Another major bee development is I passed my Basic Beemaster exam — with distinction! OK, so it is one of those tests that just about every beekeeper passes, but not everyone gets a distinction. It has given me further confidence that I have a good grounding in the subject. It also means, however, that I should really plough on with the rest of the modules. There are eight or nine of them, all a lot tougher, so it’ll take a good few years.

Oh, it’s become almost incidental, but I also got 38lbs of honey from two hives. That’s the thing about beekeeping — you start keeping hives to get honey, but, in the end, just become obsessed about bees.

 


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Shattered!

Two weeks old and fit for landfill

Just visited my allotment three hours ago, to be greeted by the scene above.  My brand-new greenhouse is in ruins and is only fit for landfill. £459 and a huge amount of work by Kurt and myself has gone down the drain. It’s a major, major setback.

What caused it, I don’t know. It was only put up two weeks ago, and so I immediately suspected the winds. However, if that was the case, then the tumbling greenhouse would have torn up one of the beds and damaged a bench I had placed beside it. Both were untouched. I began to suspect vandals, and called out the police. They popped round pretty quickly, and were sympathetic, but doubted my theory as nothing else was damaged at the site. Besides, they said, vandals rarely congregate there. They did, however, admit that the whole incident was puzzling and “bizarre” and they are going to ask around and get back to me. Continue reading